Science

Scientists have discovered a gene that reduces the severity of Covid-19 by 20%

Covid-19Photo Credit: NDTV

Covid-19 affects some people more than others, according to a study headed by Swedish researchers. The findings will also contribute to the development of vaccinations that are effective against the Sars-CoV-2 virus, according to the researchers.

Coronavirus Omicron has infected a big number of people all around the world. Since the new strain was discovered in November of last year, the numbers have been climbing at an exponential rate, with the United States and the United Kingdom being the hardest hit.

Covid-19’s behavior, on the other hand, has perplexed researchers since the outbreak began. While it has had a significant impact on some nations, with a high number of fatalities and widespread infection, the Sars-CoV-2 virus, which causes Covid-19, has largely spared others, producing the only minor infections. It’s possible that a group of European experts has figured out why.

According to the Daily Mail, Swedish researchers claimed to have uncovered a gene that lessens the severity of Covid infections by 20%. The research also explains why some people are more affected by Covid-19 than others. The researchers believe their discovery will contribute to the development of effective coronavirus vaccines. According to the researchers, the presence of this gene changes depending on ethnicity. One in every three people with white European heritage carries the gene. According to the study, it is found in eight out of ten people of African ancestry.

Researchers show that the presence of this gene changes depending on ethnicity. One in every three people with white European heritage carries the gene. According to the study, it is found in eight out of ten people of African ancestry. According to scientists, the gene instructs the body to produce a protein that is capable of breaking down Sars-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid. It also determines the length of the protein OAS-1, which is better at breaking down Sars-CoV-2 when it is longer, they noted. The research was published in the journal Nature Genetics.

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By TIS Staffer
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